what if it is habited?

http://www.eso.org/outreach/press-rel/pr-2007/pr-22-07.html

Using the ESO 3.6-m telescope, a team of Swiss, French and Portuguese scientists discovered a super-Earth about 5 times the mass of the Earth that orbits a red dwarf, already known to harbour a Neptune-mass planet. The astronomers have also strong evidence for the presence of a third planet with a mass about 8 Earth masses.

We have estimated that the mean temperature of this super-Earth lies between 0 and 40 degrees Celsius, and water would thus be liquid,” explains Stéphane Udry, from the Geneva Observatory (Switzerland) and lead-author of the paper reporting the result. “Moreover, its radius should be only 1.5 times the Earth’s radius, and models predict that the planet should be either rocky – like our Earth – or fully covered with oceans,” he adds.

http://planetquest1.jpl.nasa.gov/atlas/atlas_profile.cfm?Planet=340

Artist's impression of the planetary system around the red dwarf Gliese 581. Using the instrument HARPS on the ESO 3.6-m telescope, astronomers have uncovered 3 planets, all of relative low-mass: 5, 8 and 15 Earth masses. The five Earth-mass planet (seen in foreground - Gliese 581 c) makes a full orbit around the star in 13 days, the other two in 5 (the blue, Neptunian-like planet - Gliese 581 b) and 84 days (the most remote one, Gliese 581 d). (c) ESO

 

http://planetquest.jpl.nasa.gov/news/superEarth.cfm

 

http://www.seti.org/site/pp.asp?c=ktJ2J9MMIsE&b=2703981

SETI Institute scientists Seth Shostak, Jill Tarter, and Frank Drake have all expressed their excitement about the news and the implications for SETI searching.  Gliese 581 has been targeted for SETI searches twice in the past with no hint of a radio signal, but this new information may mean a third search with the more powerful Allen Telescope Array. 

Posted in I found about these on May 1st, 2007 by na | | 0 Comments

why do we have to die?

“the tissues of brain and heart suffer irreversible damage from lack of oxygen. This process was understood to begin after just four or five minutes. If the patient doesn't receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation within that time, and if his heart can't be restarted soon thereafter, he is unlikely to recover.

That dogma went unquestioned until researchers actually looked at oxygen-starved heart cells under a microscope.

What they saw amazed them, . “After one hour, we couldn't see evidence the cells had died. We thought we'd done something wrong.” In fact, cells cut off from their blood supply died only hours later.But if the cells are still alive, why can't doctors revive someone who has been dead for an hour?

Because once the cells have been without oxygen for more than five minutes, they die when their oxygen supply is resumed.

“It looks to us,” says Becker, “as if the cellular surveillance mechanism cannot tell the difference between a cancer cell and a cell being rep

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erfused with oxygen. Something throws the switch that makes the cell die.”

With this realization came another: that standard emergency-room procedure has it exactly backward. When someone collapses on the street of cardiac arrest, if he's lucky he will receive immediate CPR, maintaining circulation until he can be revived in the hospital. But the rest will have gone 10 or 15 minutes or more without a heartbeat by the time they reach the emergency department. And then what happens? “We give them oxygen,” Becker says. “We jolt the heart with the paddles, we pump in epinephrine to force it to beat, so it's taking up more oxygen.” Blood-starved heart muscle is suddenly flooded with oxygen, precisely the situation that leads to cell death. Instead, Becker says, we should aim to reduce oxygen uptake, slow metabolism and adjust the blood chemistry for gradual and safe reperfusion.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18368186/site/newsweek/

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Posted in I found about these on May 1st, 2007 by na | | Comments Off on why do we have to die?